Weaver working through five-year waiting list for his willow animal heads

A willow weaver whose distinctive animal head sculptures hang in homes around the world now has a five-year waiting list for his work.

Despite the huge demand for his eco artworks, Bob Johnston insists he will not take short cuts on the painstaking creative process that sees him invest up to 100 hours on each piece.

Mr Johnston, who crafted woven props for the TV fantasy drama Game of Thrones, is gradually working his way through commissions from the US, Canada Europe and Australia producing about two of the willow heads each month.

a piece of work by basket maker Bob Johnston from Bangor, Northern Ireland whose distinctive animal head sculptures hang in homes around the world now has a five-year waiting list for his work. PA Photo. Picture date: Monday December 06 2021. See PA story ULSTER Heritage. Photo credit should read: Liam McBurney/PA Wire

The married father-of-two, who weaves the sculptures in a small wooden workshop behind his house in Bangor, Co Down, says his shaggy-haired Highland cows are by far his best seller.

The 52-year-old grows most of his own willow on his father’s farm in nearby Moneyreagh, but also imports different varieties from Somerset and Belgium.

With two decades’ experience as a hand weaver, the Belfast-born craftsman got into wall-hung animal sculptures almost by chance when someone who liked masks he had made for a traditional folk theatre group – the Armagh Rhymers – asked him to create one they could display at home.

“Somebody saw one of my animal masks and wanted a wall-hung version as opposed to something that you would wear, and really all the sculptural work spiralled from that,” he said.

“So, it does have its roots in a tradition but it’s obviously just a more modern use of a traditional weaving material and traditional weaving techniques.”

Basket maker Bob Johnston from Bangor, Northern Ireland whose distinctive animal head sculptures hang in homes around the world now has a five-year waiting list for his work. PA Photo. Picture date: Monday December 06 2021. See PA story ULSTER Heritage. Photo credit should read: Liam McBurney/PA Wire

Each sculpture is unique, with Mr Johnston often working from photos of real animals sent to him by his customers. He gives each its own name. The Highland cow in his workshop this month, which is destined for a Swiss chalet, has been christened Hamish.

As well as his metre-wide Highland cows, which sell for £1,000, he also weaves stag heads and there have even been commissions from Canada for life-sized moose heads, which ended up spanning 1.5 metres from antler tip to antler tip.

On the other end of the size scale, he also gets requests to sculpt family pets.

Mr Johnston believes he has been a beneficiary of a societal push back against stuffing and hanging trophy heads of actual animals.

“Eco art has become more popular,” he said. “My work is environmentally friendly, it uses only one year growth of wood and no animals are harmed.”

Basket maker Bob Johnston from Bangor, Northern Ireland whose distinctive animal head sculptures hang in homes around the world now has a five-year waiting list for his work. PA Photo. Picture date: Monday December 06 2021. See PA story ULSTER Heritage. Photo credit should read: Liam McBurney/PA Wire

He puts the popularity of his Highland cow down to how well willow lends itself to recreating the animal’s trademark long-haired fringe.

“It just seems to suit that shaggy appearance, you can almost draw with the willow and get a bit of flow and a bit of movement into each piece,” he said.

Mr Johnston works from a seat in the middle of his workshop surrounded by baskets of willow of differing colours and textures – something he describes as “like sitting in my own palette”.

He steams the wood before using it to ensure it is soft and malleable enough to weave with.

While acknowledging a waiting list as long as his comes with stresses, he describes himself as being “very fortunate” to have so many people who want to own his work.

“It’s something I don’t want to rush, I don’t want to do it any quicker, I want to take my time with it, I want to learn, I want to develop, I want to get better,” he said.

“Each piece that I make, I try to make it slightly better than the one before.”


Douglas Mateo

Douglas holds a position as a content writer at Neptune Pine. His academic qualifications in journalism and home science have offered her a wide base from which to line various topics. He has a proficiency in scripting articles related to the Health industry, including new findings, disease-related, or epidemic-related news. Apart from this, Douglas writes an independent blog and assists people in living healthy life.

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